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President Jacob Zuma and his wife meet Prince Harry in South Africa


Prince Harry has met with South Africa’s controversial president Jacob Zuma, who brought just one of his four wives and one of his 21 children along to meet the royal.

On arrival at the official presidential residence in Pretoria, the Prince was warmly greeted by Zuma, Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, who is considered South Africa’s first lady.

The meeting was also attended by Zuma’s English-educated daughter Nkosazana Msholozi, 33.

Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, who is one of the president's four wives after marrying him in 2010, was also in attendance and beamed as the royal kissed her on the cheek

Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, who is one of the president’s four wives after marrying him in 2010, was also in attendance and beamed as the royal kissed her on the cheek

Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, a former bank clerk, married the president in 2010

Although she is one of four wives she is considered South Africa's first lady and has accompanied her husband on official overseas visits

Thobeka Madiba-Zuma, a former bank clerk, married the president in 2010. Although she is one of four wives she is considered South Africa’s first lady and has accompanied her husband on official overseas visits

As he sat down next to the president, Harry told him: ‘Every time I see the news you are in a different part of the world.’

Zuma replied: ‘That’s absolutely true. I’m looking forward to finishing my term and taking a rest.’

As the president and Harry sat on chairs with the two women on a sofa, a television showed the Oscar Pistorius judgement being delivered.

Prince Harry, 31, met with South African President Jacob Zuma in Pretoria on the final leg of his official visit to South Africa, the day after using his visit to promote animal conservation charities in Kruger National Park

Prince Harry, 31, met with South African President Jacob Zuma in Pretoria on the final leg of his official visit to South Africa, the day after using his visit to promote animal conservation charities in Kruger National Park

One committed suicide in 2000 and he is divorced from Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, who is tipped as a possible future president of South Africa.

His daughter Nkosazana, 33, has a master’s degree from City University in international journalism.

She also holds a degree in international relations and diplomacy from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

Despite these links to the UK, relations with Zuma have long been frosty, and his relations with the US are also not on a friendly footing.

Zuma has previously refused to meet the wife of the US President, Michelle Obama.

His presidency has also been overshadowed with allegations of corruption which have dented his popularity.

Nkosazana Zuma, 33, (right) was the only one of Zuma's 21 children to be invited to greet the royal

Nkosazana Zuma, 33, (right) was the only one of Zuma’s 21 children to be invited to greet the royal

Nkosazana has a master's degree from City University in international journalism. She also holds a degree in international relations and diplomacy from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London

Nkosazana has a master’s degree from City University in international journalism. She also holds a degree in international relations and diplomacy from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London

But speaking ahead of the meeting a royal aide made clear that Harry wanted to use it to raise issues close to his heart .

He said: ‘This meeting is an important opportunity to discuss issues close to the Prince’s heart at the highest level of the South African Government.

‘In addition to speaking about his work with vulnerable young people, The Prince is grateful to have the chance to raise the urgency of South Africa’s poaching crisis.

‘As he said yesterday, South African leadership over the issue of poaching is vital.’

Zuma's presidency has been overshadowed with allegations of corruption which have dented his popularity

Zuma’s presidency has been overshadowed with allegations of corruption which have dented his popularity

Harry made it clear he wanted to meet the president to discuss issues close to his heart such as conservation.

After the audience, which lasted almost an hour, he said he'd had 'productive talks' with the president

Harry made it clear he wanted to meet the president to discuss issues close to his heart such as conservation. After the audience, which lasted almost an hour, he said he’d had ‘productive talks’ with the president

As he left the residence after almost a hour of what was described as ‘productive’ talks, Prince Harry bade a warm goodbye to President Zuma’s wife.

He told told her how good it was to have the chance to speak with her husband.

Traditionally after such meetings the president and visiting head of state come out onto the steps of the residence and talk about their discussions with the press.

As Harry is not a head of state this was not considered necessary.

The pair talked about what British and South African leaders and organisations could do together to support vulnerable young people - including those with HIV and AIDS - through sport and other creative approaches

The pair talked about what British and South African leaders and organisations could do together to support vulnerable young people – including those with HIV and AIDS – through sport and other creative approaches

They also discussed the conservation work that's being done at Kruger National Park after the heartbreaking sight that met Harry yesterday - the carcass of a mother rhino and her calf, slaughtered by poachers

They also discussed the conservation work that’s being done at Kruger National Park after the heartbreaking sight that met Harry yesterday – the carcass of a mother rhino and her calf, slaughtered by poachers

But the prince stood rather awkwardly as the British High Commissioner, Judith Macgregor, spoke on his behalf.

She said: ‘Can I just say that His Royal Highness has had a wonderful conversation with President Zuma.

‘He told him all about his trip and his engagements with so many young people in South Africa in sport, in soccer, rugby, but also in outreach through communities.

‘The visit is not over. We are going on now also to work with young people improving their skills.

‘And we have also spoken about Kruger, talking about the importance of conservation and taking all the efforts to preserve South Africa’s marvellous wildlife further.

‘Thank you very much.’

Harry offered his encouragement for initiatives to tackle poaching and told President Zuma about meeting so many of the nation's young people and pledged to help 'work with them to improve their skills'

Harry offered his encouragement for initiatives to tackle poaching and told President Zuma about meeting so many of the nation’s young people and pledged to help ‘work with them to improve their skills’

The Oscar Pistorius verdict came through on television during the meeting, in which the fallen paralympian's sentence was found guilty of murdering Reeva Steenkamp and will be re-sentenced for the more serious crime

The Oscar Pistorius verdict came through on television during the meeting, in which the fallen paralympian’s sentence was found guilty of murdering Reeva Steenkamp and will be re-sentenced for the more serious crime

A spokesman for Prince Harry added: ‘Prince Harry had a friendly, constructive, and wide ranging conversation with President Zuma.

The Prince spoke about what British and South African leaders and organisations could do together to support vulnerable young people – including those with HIV and AIDS – through sport and other creative approaches.

‘Prince Harry told the President about his experience working alongside wildlife rangers in South Africa and offered his encouragement for efforts to halt the country’s escalating poaching crisis.’

President Zuma, 73, has become an increasing embarrassment to South Africa in recent years, most notably over the £9.5 million of state funds spent on revamping his country home.

Harry's visit to the presidential residence in Pretoria was only confirmed yesterday. President Zuma has previously refused to meet Michelle Obama, wife of the US president 

Harry’s visit to the presidential residence in Pretoria was only confirmed yesterday. President Zuma has previously refused to meet Michelle Obama, wife of the US president

The improvements, which included a swimming pool, an amphitheatre and a cattle kraal, were defended by the government on the grounds that they were security upgrades.

One of the MPs allowed to inspect the estate described the improvements as ‘obscene’.

Mmusi Maimane, leader of South Africa’s official opposition said: ‘It sticks out like a sore thumb amid a sea of poverty, this opulent display by the president.’

After he was pilloried in a report by a public watchdog, he suffered the indignity of being booed at a memorial service for Nelson Mandela in front of world leaders including Barack Obama.

He was ordered by the country’s public protector in 2013 to pay back the money, but has failed to do so. In May this year a police report cleared him of any wrongdoing.

President Zuma previously criticised the UK for having a 'colonial attitude' towards his multiple marriages, but he was still happy to welcome the royal to an audience at his residence 

President Zuma previously criticised the UK for having a ‘colonial attitude’ towards his multiple marriages, but he was still happy to welcome the royal to an audience at his residence

Unpopular at home, not least for having failed to deliver improvements in health and crime, Mr Zuma also has an uneasy relationship with Britain.

In October 2014 he cancelled a visit to the UK after he was told he could not have a meeting with David Cameron but would have to make do with the then deputy prime minister Nick Clegg.

A South African newspaper said he had thrown a ‘royal tantrum’ at what he saw as an official snub.

Looking dapper in a dark blue suit, white shirt and pale blue tie, Harry was greeted at Jacob Zuma's home in Pretoria. On the last day of his four-day official tour of South Africa, Harry will visit Siyabonga Secondary School in Soweto township

Looking dapper in a dark blue suit, white shirt and pale blue tie, Harry was greeted at Jacob Zuma’s home in Pretoria. On the last day of his four-day official tour of South Africa, Harry will visit Siyabonga Secondary School in Soweto township

Relations between Britain and Mr Zuma have been cool since 2011 when he accused Britain and the U.S. of attempting ‘regime change’ during the uprising against Colonel Gaddafi in Libya.

In 2014 he abruptly pulled out of the memorial service for the late Nelson Mandela at Westminster Abbey in what was seen as a calculated snub. The date of the service had already been changed once so he could attend.

During his state visit to the UK in 2010, annoyed by some of the media coverage which concentrated on the fact that he then had three wives.

He gave an interview in which he accused the British of having a ‘colonial’ attitude towards him.

He currently has four wives, although he has been married six times.

Controversy surrounding Mr Zuma dates from before he was president.

Later today, Harry will meet students who are participating in Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme and chat to 20 students in an informal discussion group 

Later today, Harry will meet students who are participating in Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme and chat to 20 students in an informal discussion group

He was acquitted of raping a young family friend, and narrowly escaped prosecution for corruption on a technicality shortly before coming to power in 2009.

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On the last day of his four-day official tour of South Africa, Harry then paid a visit to Siyabonga Secondary School in Soweto township.

He met students taking part in the Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme, which uses the former President and anti-apartheid hero’s life to inspire young people in leadership.

On a visit to Siyabonga Secondary School in Soweto township Harry met students taking part in the Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme, which uses the former President and anti-apartheid hero's life to inspire young people in leadership

On a visit to Siyabonga Secondary School in Soweto township Harry met students taking part in the Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme, which uses the former President and anti-apartheid hero’s life to inspire young people in leadership

'You have to ask, if I had a young person following me, how would I want them to behave?' Harry said, as he discussed the importance of people in the public eye being role models 

‘You have to ask, if I had a young person following me, how would I want them to behave?’ Harry said, as he discussed the importance of people in the public eye being role models

The youth development course promotes skills to succeed as a leader and as an entrepreneur, by learning from local and international leaders or ‘Life Champions’.

Speaking to a group of students, Harry urged them to lead by example.

‘I would never want anyone to follow me in the bad things I do, only the good things,’ he said.

Speaking about other high profile people, such as sports stars, he said that people in the public eye should consider themselves role models.

Harry seemed to bond with 14-year-old Prince Mtimkulu as they sat side-by-side on bean bags in the school's library and chatted about football. When asked about his favourite team, Prince explained that he's a fan of Soweto-based Kaizer Chiefs FC

Harry seemed to bond with 14-year-old Prince Mtimkulu as they sat side-by-side on bean bags in the school’s library and chatted about football. When asked about his favourite team, Prince explained that he’s a fan of Soweto-based Kaizer Chiefs FC

The teenager, who was clutching a South African flag, smiled with delight as he chatted to the visiting royal.  Prince said that Harry didn't comment on the similarities in their names, but he added: 'I liked him very much.'

The teenager, who was clutching a South African flag, smiled with delight as he chatted to the visiting royal.  Prince said that Harry didn’t comment on the similarities in their names, but he added: ‘I liked him very much.’

‘We have a certain responsibility to make sure that young people look at us and say: “That’s how I want to live”. Then hopefully everyone else will follow,’ he added.

‘It’s very important that people in a public position behave well.

‘Because you have to ask, if I had a young person following me, how would I want them to behave?’

Harry has, of course, earned his fair share of negative headlines over the years falling out of nightclubs, brawling with photographers and a teenage cannabis scandal.

The down-to-earth royal posed for a group shot with young people who are taking part in the Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme

The down-to-earth royal posed for a group shot with young people who are taking part in the Nelson Mandela – The Champion Within programme

Harry was joined by three South Africa winners of the Queen's Young Leaders title, Emma Dicks, Nosipho Bele and Patrice Madurai, who were invited to appear as 'Life Champions' for the day

Harry was joined by three South Africa winners of the Queen’s Young Leaders title, Emma Dicks, Nosipho Bele and Patrice Madurai, who were invited to appear as ‘Life Champions’ for the day

And there was, of course, his decision to wear a Nazi uniform to a friend’s birthday party.

Now a markedly more mature 31-year-old, the royal used his time at the school in South Africa’s most famous township to promote a more positive message.

He was joined by the three South Africa winners of the Queen’s Young Leaders title, Emma Dicks, Nosipho Bele and Patrice Madurai, who were invited to appear as ‘Life Champions’ for the day.

Sitting on a bean bag with a small group of the students, aged 14-18, he also spoke about how his decade in the Army had helped him become the person he is today.

Harry reminded the students that people would always be watching their actions. 'You want to make sure you live your life as good as possible,' he advised 

Harry reminded the students that people would always be watching their actions. ‘You want to make sure you live your life as good as possible,’ he advised

Students enjoyed a lively conversation with the Prince in  relaxed surroundings

Students enjoyed a lively conversation with the Prince in relaxed surroundings

He told them: ‘You want to make sure you live your life as good as possible, always remember people are watching every single step you make.

‘If you do something bad a lot of young people will follow.

‘You have a responsibility to live up to your beliefs and encourage young people to follow in your footsteps.’

Asked about his experience, Harry added: ‘I spent 10 years in the military and enjoyed every minute of it.

‘I had the opportunity to go university which I could have easily done.

Prince Harry shared personal insights with the students, including speaking fondly of his time in the army. 'Ever since I was small boy I loved the idea of being in combats and camouflage, flying a helicopter - that was the cool bit, the fun bit,' he explained

Prince Harry shared personal insights with the students, including speaking fondly of his time in the army. ‘Ever since I was small boy I loved the idea of being in combats and camouflage, flying a helicopter – that was the cool bit, the fun bit,’ he explained

‘But ever since I was small boy I loved the idea of being in combats and camouflage, flying a helicopter – that was the cool bit, the fun bit,

‘When you become part of that organisation – we call it the university of life – you get taught to be a different person.

‘It’s very easy to grow up with out any guidance and go off track.

‘The Army, for me and so many young people, it can give you guidance, provides opportunities and gives you confidence.

'For somebody like me those ten years taught me what being a leader is all about,' Harry told the students, speaking of the time he spent as a serviceman 

‘For somebody like me those ten years taught me what being a leader is all about,’ Harry told the students, speaking of the time he spent as a serviceman

‘I genuinely believe that being part of an organisation like that, knowing the opportunities that I had, helps you realise what sort of talents and skills you have.

‘Unless you get tested, how are you going to know?

‘I had ten fantastic years in the Army, from a leadership point of view I think it was crucial, for somebody like me those ten years taught me what being a leader is all about.’

He also told the children about his Sentebale charity in Lesotho and how he was driven to launch it after seeing the plight of youngsters there during his gap year visit in 2004.

Later today, Harry is due to visit a Youth Empowerment Exposition in a trendy community creative space called The Bus Factory. There he will meet young entrepreneurs involved in programmes to develop their business skills, using both digital platforms and more traditional outlets.

Later today, Harry is due to visit a Youth Empowerment Exposition in a trendy community creative space called The Bus Factory. There he will meet young entrepreneurs involved in programmes to develop their business skills, using both digital platforms and more traditional outlets.

During another session, Harry seemed to bond with 14-year-old Prince Mtimkulu as they sat side-by-side on bean bags in the school’s library.

Afterwards Prince said the royal had not passed comment on his name, but had asked him about his favourite football teams and players.

Prince, who is a fan of Soweto-based Kaizer Chiefs FC, added: ‘I liked him very much.’

Harry was then mobbed by pupils as he stood up to leave, with many grabbing him for a hug.

As he left, he told them: ‘Don’t forget us and don’t forget what we talked about here.

‘When things get really, really hard, persevere. Keep pushing forward and people will follow you.’

Jabulile Mathonsi, 14, who had overcome her nerves to speak in front of the royal visitor earlier in the session, said: ‘He told me I did a very good job by not being shy. He was very nice.’

Harry encouraged the students to make positive decisions, saying: 'You want to make sure you live your life as good as possible. Always remember people are watching every single step you make.'

Harry encouraged the students to make positive decisions, saying: ‘You want to make sure you live your life as good as possible. Always remember people are watching every single step you make.’

Tshepiso Ramano, 19, said: ‘It was wow, everything was exceptional. It was quite an experience.

‘Who would have thought that a prince from Britain would come to Braamfischer, Soweto, to talk to us.’

Later today, Harry is due to visit a Youth Empowerment Exposition in a trendy community creative space called The Bus Factory.

There he will meet young entrepreneurs involved in programmes to develop their business skills, using both digital platforms and more traditional outlets.

Speaking about his 10 years in the army, Harry said it had taught him to be a different person and helped him to realise the talents and skills he possessed 

Speaking about his 10 years in the army, Harry said it had taught him to be a different person and helped him to realise the talents and skills he possessed

The Expo takes place in a in the heart of The Johannesburg Central Business District (CBD) – a former no-go area which has been regenerated to become an enterprise hub.

The engagement will be fun and full of energy, and promises to end on a high with a hip hop dance routine.

Prince Harry’s final engagement of the tour will be a visit to The Nelson Mandela Foundation where Prince Harry will meet the revered former leader’s wife, Mrs Graca Machel.

Saturday sees the second anniversary of Madiba’s death.

Before leaving, Harry urged the students not to forget their conversation and advised them to persevere no matter how tough life becomes. 'Keep pushing forward and people will follow you,' he said

Before leaving, Harry urged the students not to forget their conversation and advised them to persevere no matter how tough life becomes. ‘Keep pushing forward and people will follow you,’ he said

Harry will attend a commemoration of Mandela called ‘Remembering Madiba’ and tour the private archives of the Centre for Memory.

A Kensington Palace spokesman said: ‘The Prince has long admired President Nelson Mandela and his family had the honour of meeting and hosting Mr. Mandela on a number of occasions.

‘In the week which sees the anniversary of the former President’s passing, Prince Harry is keen to learn how South Africa is using Mr. Mandela’s legacy to inspire and empower the next generation of South Africans.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3344164/President-Jacob-Zuma-wife-meet-Prince-Harry-South-Africa.html#ixzz3tGlqMkXY
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